Books on Buddhist Studies

Showing all 15 Products
  • Grid List

Filter

The Art of Ancient India
To scholars in the field, the need for an up-to-date overview of the art of South Asia has been apparent for decades. Although many regional and dynastic genres of Indic art are fairly well understood, the broad, overall representation of India’s centuries of splendor has been lacking. The Art of Ancient India is the result of the author’s aim to provide such a synthesis. Noted expert Sherman E. Lee has commented: “Not since Coomaraswamy’s History of Indian and Indonesian Art (1927) has there been a survey of such completeness.” Indeed, this work restudies and reevaluates every frontier of ancient Indic art – from its prehistoric roots up to the period of Muslim rule, from the Himalayan north to the tropical south, and from the earliest extant writing through the most modern scholarship on the subject.

This dynamic survey-generously complemented with 775 illustrations, including 48 in full color and numerous architectural ground plans, and detailed maps and fine drawings, and further enhanced by its guide to Sanskrit, copious notes, extensive bibliography, and glossary of South Asian art terms-is the most comprehensive and most fully illustrated study of South Asian art available.

The works and monuments included in this volume have been selected not only for their artistic merit but also in order to both provide general coverage and include transitional works that furnish the key to an all encompassing view of the art.

An outstanding portrayal of ancient India’s highest intellectual and technical achievements, this volume is written for many audiences: scholars, for whom it provides an up-to-date background against which to examine their own areas of study; teachers and students of college level, for whom it supplies a complete summary of and a resource for their own deeper investigations into Indic art; and curious readers, for whom it gives a broad-based introduction to this fascinating area of world art.
To scholars in the field, the need for an up-to-date overview of the art of...
$120.00
The Emptiness of Emptiness
The Madhyamika or Middle Way, a school of Buddhist thought that originated in India in the second or third century, was a decisive influence in the subsequent developement of Mahayana Buddhism. In a new approach to its study, The Emptiness of Emptiness reconsiders the central doctrine of emptiness and shows that the Madhyamika critique of all philosophical views is both subtler and more radical than most Western interpretation indicates.

Building on earlier research into Sanskrit and Tibetan sources, the present work also examines the assumptions that have governed the study of Asian soteriological philosophy. In assessing the philosophical significance of the Madhyamika, the author demonstrates that the thrust toward a self-critical awareness of methodological presuppositions lies at the very heart of early Indian Madhyamika.

In this analysis, the self-deconstructing categories of Nagarjuna and his immediate followers emerge as an edifying philosophy that may have a great deal to offer to discussion of the related problems of objectivity and relativism issues crucial to current philosophical conversation in the West.

The volume also contains the first complete English translation of Candrakirti's Madhyamakavatara (The Entry into the Middle Way), with extensive exegetical and text-critical notes.
The Madhyamika or Middle Way, a school of Buddhist thought that originated in India in...
$34.00
Bauddha Darshan tatha anya Bharatiya Darshan
Bauddha Darshan tatha anya Bharatiya Darshan (Pratham Bhag): Aetihasik Shodhpurna, Pakshapatrahit, Tulnatamak Vivechan
Bauddha Darshan tatha anya Bharatiya Darshan (Pratham Bhag): Aetihasik Shodhpurna, Pakshapatrahit, Tulnatamak Vivechan
$33.00
Buddhist Suttas (SBE Vol. 11)
These seven scriptural writings are considered to be the most important and oldest of the Buddhist religion. Originally written in the Pali language, they date to the fourth and third centuries BC. This early date is what makes them so important —they form the very core of Buddhist teachings, sought after and studied by monks and scholars for centuries.
These seven scriptural writings are considered to be the most important and oldest of the...
$22.00
The Dhammapada and Suttanipata (SBE Vol. 10)
The Dhammapada and Suttanipata (SBE Vol. 10): A Collection of Verses, Being One of the Canonical Books of the Buddhists
The Dhammapada and Suttanipata (SBE Vol. 10): A Collection of Verses, Being One of the...
$26.00
The Questions of King Milinda (SBE Vol. 35)
The present book being an English translation of a German book entitled Der Saiva Siddhanta by H.W. Schomerus gives a full and documented account of this theistic movement then as now little known in the West. The book quickly became and still is the major reference work in this field in any European language.
The present book being an English translation of a German book entitled Der Saiva Siddhanta...
$24.00
Vinaya Texts (SBE Vol. 13)
First of three-volume set of Canonical texts of Theravada Buddhism outlining monastic rules; this volume -- the Patimokkha, and the Mahavagga I-IV.
First of three-volume set of Canonical texts of Theravada Buddhism outlining monastic rules; this volume...
$27.00
Vinaya Texts, Part 2 (SBE Vol. 17)
Second to three-volume set of Canonical texts of Theravada Buddhism outlining monastic rules; this volume -- the Mahavagga V-X, and the Kullavagga I-III.
Second to three-volume set of Canonical texts of Theravada Buddhism outlining monastic rules; this volume...
$27.00
Vinaya Texts, Pt.3 (SBE Vol. 20)
Third in a three-volume set of Canonical texts of Theravada Buddhism outlining monastic rules; this volume -- the Kullavagga, IV-end.
Third in a three-volume set of Canonical texts of Theravada Buddhism outlining monastic rules; this...
$27.00
The Sacred Books of China Pt. 1 (SBE Vol. 3)
Part I: The Shu King the Religious Portion of the Shih King The Hsiao King

While submitting here some prefatory observations on the version of the Shri King presented in this volume I think it well to prefix also a brief account of what are regarded as the sacred books of the religions of China. Those religions are three Confucianism, Taism and Buddhism.

I begin with a few words about the last. To translate any of its books does not belong to my province and more than a few words from me are unnecessary. It has been said that Buddhism was introduced into China in the third century B.C. but it certainly did not obtain an authoritative recognition in the empire till the third quarter of our first century. Its texts were translated into Chinese one portion after another as they were gradually obtained from India but it was not till very long after words that the Chinese possessed in their own language a complete copy of the Buddhist canon. Translations from the Sanskrit constitute the Principal part of the Buddhistic literature of china though there are also many original works in Chinese belonging to it.

II. Confucianism is the religion of China par excellence, and is named from the great sage who lived in the fifth and sixth centuries B.C. Confucius indeed did not originate the system, nor was he the first to inculcate its principles or enjoin its forms of worship. He said of himself (Analects, VII, i) that he was a transmitter and not a maker, one who believed in and loved the ancients; and hence it is said in the thirtieth chapter of the Doctrine of the Mean, ascribed to his grandson, that ‘he handed down the doctrines of Yâo and Shun, as if they had been his ancestors, and elegantly displayed the regulations of Wan and Wan, taking them as his models.’

In fulfilling what he considered to be his mission, Confucius did little towards committing to writing the views of antiquity according to his own conception of them. He discoursed about them freely with the disciples. of his school, from whom we have received a good deal of what he said; and it is possible that his accounts of the ancient views and practices took, unconsciously to himself, some colour from the peculiar character of his mind. But his favorite method was to direct the attention of his disciples to the ancient literature of the nation. He would neither affirm nor relate anything for which he could not adduce some document of acknowledged authority. He said on one occasion (Analects, III, ix) that he could describe the ceremonies of the dynasties of Hsiâ (B.C. 2205—1767) and Yin (B. C. 1766—1123), but did not do so, because the records and scholars in the two states of Káu, that had been assigned to the descendants of their sovereigns, could not sufficiently attest his words. It is an error even to suppose that he compiled the historical documents, poems, and other ancient books from various works existing in his time. Portions of the oldest works had already perished. His study of those that remained, and his exhortations to his disciples also to study them, contributed to their preservation. What he wrote or said about their meaning should be received by us with reverence; but if all the works which he handled had come down to us entire, we should have been, so far as it is possible for foreigners to be, in the same position as he was for learning the ancient religion of his country. Out text-books would be the same as his. Unfortunately most of the ancient books suffered loss and injury after Confucius had passed from the stage of life. We have reason, however, to be thankful that we possess so many and so much of them. No other literature, comparable to them for antiquity, has cçme down to us in such a state of preservation.

But the reader must bear in mind that the ancient books of China do not profess to have been inspired, or to contain what we should call a Revelation. Historians, poets, and others wrote them as they were moved in their own minds. An old poem may occasionally contain what it says was spoken by God, but we can only understand that language as calling attention emphatically to the statements to which it is prefixed. We also read of Heaven’s raising up the great ancient sovereigns and teachers, and variously assisting them to accomplish their undertakings; but all this need not be more than what a religious man of any country might affirm at the present day of direction, help, and guidance given to himself and others from above. But while the old Chinese books do not profess to contain any divine revelation, the references in them to religious views and practices are numerous and it is from these that the student has to fashion for himself an outline of the early religion of the people. I will now state what the books are.

First, and of greatest importance, there is the Book of Historical Documents, called the Shü and, since the period of the Han dynasty (began B.C. 202), the Shu King. Its documents commence with the reign of Yao in the twenty-fourth century B. C., and come down to that of king Hsiang of the Kau dynasty, B.C. 651—619. The earliest chapters were not contemporaneous with the events which they describe, but the others begin to be so in the twenty- second century B. C. The reader will find a translation of the whole of this work without abridgment.
Part I: The Shu King the Religious Portion of the Shih King The Hsiao KingWhile...
$27.00
The Fo-Sho-Hing-Tsan-King (SBE Vol. 19)
-
-
$27.00
The Zend-Avesta, Pt. 2 (SBE Vol. 23)
-
-
$24.00
The Zend-Avesta Pt. 1(SBE Vol. 4): Parsis
This book comprises fifteen research articles primarily based on the discipline of Indian and Buddhist studies the connection is designed to propose a Buddhist philosophy of religion--that the insight of prajna and sunyata initiates a future religion which is freed both from conflict between reasoning and believing, and from goal-oriented cycles of life. It addresses transformation from the conflict-ridden quest for a supreme being, to the search for a non-theistic nature of spirituality that provides a foundation for universal human happiness and salvation for the discipline of Buddhist studies, this connection also demonstrates the productive value of drawing upon cross-cultural and cross-racial literary sources and traditions
This book comprises fifteen research articles primarily based on the discipline of Indian and Buddhist...
$24.00
Abhisamayalankara Prajna Paramita Upadesa Sastra
  • Product Code :BK10537
  • Size :5.7 x 0.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Weight :280g.
  • Author :Bodhisattva Maitreya
  • ISBN :8170303044 ,978-8170303046
  • Publisher :Sri Satguru Publication
  • Edition :December 31, 1929
  • Cover :Hardcover
  • Language :English
  • Pages :129

Canonical work of the Yogacara school in Buddhism; includes Tibetan translation.

Specification Product Code :BK10537 Size :5.7 x 0.5 x 8.5 inches Weight :280g. Author :Bodhisattva...
$31.00
Aniccatta/Anityata
  • Product Code :BK10544
  • Size :8.7 inch X 5.5 inch
  • Weight :410g.
  • Author :Mangala R. Chinchore
  • ISBN :8170304561
  • Publisher :Sri Satguru Publication
  • Edition :1995
  • Cover :Hardcover
  • Language :English
  • Pages :262

    This work undertakes a detailed study of the nature and rationale of Anitayata the third pillar of Buddhism. It explores into the concerned rationale in its three phases (a) Anityata in general in the sense of permanent susceptibility to change (b) Ksanikata as the adequate condition of the occurrence / cognition of change and (c) Ksanabhanga as the adequate condition of the occurrence cognition of the most radical change. The inquiry into the rationale of Anitayata in its different phases in undertaken with two aims in view (a) To explore into the aspects of Buddhist opposition to permanence and or stability in any form and adopted in anybody Buddhist or non Buddhist and (b) to bring out conceptual change in the Buddhist camp and articulate the way Anityata provided a sound basis for putting forth characteristically Buddhist alternative ontology and or anthropology in opposition ot th eons which were then current opposition to the ones which were then current assessing the significance and importance of it. This study is novel and no one has yet undertaken any of its kind.

    About the Author
    Dr. Mangala R, Chinchore M.A Ph.D. in Philosophy (Poona University) its working as a faculty Member in the Department of Philosophy University of Poona. Apart from participating in national and international Seminars and conferences and contributing well received papers to them she is presently working as a career awarded of the U.G.C.

    Her previous publications are Vadanyaya A Glimpse of Nyaya Buddhist Controversy, Dharmakirti’s Theory of Hetucentricity of Anumana and Anatta/Anatamata An Analysis of Buddhist Anti Substantialist Crusade of them the second was given the Swami Pranavananda Award by the I.P.C. in 1991. She has also to her credit couple of research papers published in nationally and internationally renowned journals.

    Specification Product Code :BK10544 Size :8.7 inch X 5.5 inch Weight :410g. Author :Mangala R....
    $29.00
    About Books on Buddhist Studies