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Living by Zen
Living by Zen

From the Jacket:


The book contains a number of essays which D.T. Suzuki wrote from time to time concerning the specificity and uniqueness of Zen Buddhism, or the school of Buddhism that values meditative practice more than philosophical thinking. The book may be considered as an introduction to Zen on account of the concern shown for such themes which a beginner needs to know. In the very first essay is explained as to what Zen way of life denotes. Many find it difficult to comprehend the language of Zen. That is the author has made an attempt at clarifying the Zen idea of a koan, which is a paradoxical question verging almost on absurdity. It is believed that enlightenment or satori comes to be once a koan is understood. The book offers a rich banquet to those who want to taste the flavour of the feast of Zen.


Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki was Professor of Buddhist Philosophy at the Otani University, Kyoto. He is probably the greatest living authority on Buddhist Philosophy and certainly the greatest authority on Zen Buddhism.

$16
Early Buddhist Monachism
Early Buddhist Monachism

About the Book


This treatise on the growth and early development of the Sangha (Buddhist Monastic Order) has often been referred to by scholars as the most complete and masterly treatment of the subject and, as such, invaluable to students of Buddhism.


It has besides a peculiar importance in relation to the history of Indian culture, As the author says, "Indian culture is composite and the Buddhist contribution to it during the two millennia contribution to it during the two Millennia and a half that Buddhism was a living religion in India is so much a part and parcel of it that no true view of Indian culture is possible by ignoring the Buddhist contribution". This contribution was made through the organization of Buddhist monkhood. The author has shown with a wealth of masterly scholarship how this organization was established and developed in India. His chapters on the Patimokkha and Vinaya regulation of the monk community, the growth of conoebium among them, their internal polity and communal life, written from a scientific and historical point of view, are interestingly presented and will hold the general reader. First submitted anonymously as a prize-thesis to the University of Calcutta, it won the Griffith Memorial Prize in 1919. The verdict of the University examiners has been confirmed by Buddhistic scholars the world over who hailed it on its first publication as a work of exceptional originality and of great value in the study of Buddhism and Buddhist history


About the Author


Dr. Sukumar Dutt was born in 1891 at Barisal (now in Bangladesh). He specialized during his academic career in English literature in which he held doctorate. But his interest in Buddhism and ancient Indian history had been roused early in life by his uncle the late Aswini Kumar Dutt, a famous nationalist leader of Bengal of the first three decades of this century. Dr. Dutt had over many years carried on studies in this line and was recognized as one of the most accomplished scholars of Buddhism in this country. He was a Senior Research Fellow of the University of Delhi. His published works are The Buddha and Five After-centuries, Buddhist Monks and Monasteries of India: Their History and Their Contribution to India Culture; Buddhism in History and Culture; Buddhism in History and culture of East Asian People; Mahaparinirbaner Katha (in Bengali).


He was translating 'Bangalier Itihas' by Prof. Niharranjan ray when he died on April 9, 1970

$22
Buddhist Annals and Chronicles of South-East Asia
Buddhist Annals and Chronicles of South-East Asia

The annals and chronicles are Important for a study of political, religious, cultural and literary history of a country. This book Introduces to the readers for the first time a new picture in the field of annals and chronicles. It gives, not only, the history and the development of the Buddhist annals and chronicles of South-East Asia but it also refers to the important role played by the chronicles in the field of Pali and Singhalese literature in Ceylon. Fortunately, this is a first attempt, to give a connected account of the Buddhist annals and chronicles of South and South-East Asia, on the basis of all available sources. The book should be found useful to readers interested in the religious and cultural history of South and South-East Asia.


From the Jacket:


The annals and chronicles are important for a study of political, religious, cultural and literary history of a country. This book introduces to the readers for the first time a new picture in the field of annals and chronicles. It gives, not only, the history and the development of the Buddhist annals and chronicles of South-East Asia but it also refers to the important role played by the chroniclers in the field of Pali and Singhalese literature in Ceylon. Fortunately, this is a first attempt, to give a connected account of the Buddhist annals and chronicles of South and South-East Asia, on the basis of all available sources. The book should be found useful to readers interested in the religious and cultural history of South and South-East Asia.

$20
Buddhism: A Religion of Salvation
Buddhism: A Religion of Salvation

From the Jacket:


Buddhism as a religion of salvation is not so much concerned with the question of heaven and hell as much as with the existential question of suffering. It is, thus, the text of human suffering that has determined the soteriological goal of Buddhism, which is characterized as to how to obtain release from human suffering itself. Since suffering is a fact of life, so the aim has been to search for such ways and means by the application of which suffering may be overcome. It is this concern of Buddhism with suffering that is the focus of this book, that is, what basically suffering means to a Buddhist. It is on the basis of this insight of the Buddha that the Buddhist thinkers have attempted to find such a practical framework that would serve that purpose of reaching the transcendent goal of salvation. Whatever the Buddhists have spoken about suffering, it must be seen as a practical devise of reaching the goal of salvation.


About the Author:


Moti Lal Pandit has been engaged in the Indological research for last thirty years. Upon completing his studies, the author had the opportunity of studying the abstruse Vedantic texts from Dayananda Saraswati. Later he studied the important tantric texts of Kashmir Shaiviam from Dr. Baljinath Pandit. The author has contributed numerous papers on Comparative Religion. Theology, Spirituality and Mysticism. The earlier works of the author include Vedic Hinduism; Philosophy of the Upanishads; The Essentials of Buddhism; Beyond the Word; Transcendence and Negation; Sunyata: The Essence of Mahayana Spirituality; and The Hidden Way."

$29
The Surangama Sutra (Leng Yen Ching)
The Surangama Sutra (Leng Yen Ching)

The Surangama Sutra, or Leng Yen Ching, is a Buddhist apocalyptic text, which, alongwith an abridged commentary by Ch' an Master Han Shan, has ably been translated from Chinese into English by Charles Luk. Containing apocalyptic thinking, it is asserted that this Sutra will disappear upon the disappearance of the dharma. The basic concern of the text is to point out as to how the law of causality terminates in the emergence of delusion, and on account of delusion Samsaric bondage is given rise to. The only way to overcome delusion, and thereby bondage, is to attain the state of enlightenment. Since the attainment of enlightenment is seen as the solution of the problem, the text, thus, engages in laying down the road map of specific practices that enable one to reach the liberative goal of salvation, which is freedom from the law of causality and thereby from delusion and bondage. Insofar as the store consciousness (alaya) continues to function, to that extent causality will remain operative. The methods, as developed in the text, are thus aimed at breaking the alaya. Upon the destruction of three marks of the alaya, which are self-evidencing, perception and form, the practitioner attains what is called the Surangama samadhi, or the gateway to perfect enlightenment. Upon the attainment of enlightenment is revealed the nature of the Tathagata store of one reality. Preface This important sermon contains the essence of the Buddha's teaching and, as foretold by Him, will be the first sutra to disappear in the Dharma ending age. It reveals the law of causality relating to both delusion and enlightenment and teaches the methods of practice and realization to destroy forever the roots of birth and death. It aims at breaking up alaya, the store consciousness, whose three characteristics are: self-evidencing, perception and form, by means of the three meditative studies of noumenon which is immaterial, of phenomenon which is unreal and of the 'Mean' which is inclusive of both, and leads to the all-embracing Surangama samadhi which is the gateway to Perfect Enlightenment and reveals the nature of the Tathagata store of One Reality

$29
A Manual of Buddhism In its modern development
A Manual of Buddhism In its modern development

From the Jacket


Mrs Rhys Davids, A Manual of Buddhism delves deep into the Pali Pitakas and Sanskrit Sutras of Buddhism, removes the huge mass of arid theology accumulated during the passage of that religion through different periods, different tongues and different races of men, and presents, in its pristine purity, the original message of the Buddha, who so extended the concepts of "way" and "Dharma" in the Upanishads, as to suit all men who "eddy about here and there, striving blindly, achieving nothing." He showed a way, which steered clear of the two extremes of self-indulgence and severe austerities; which was not an adage of worldly wisdom and prudence, no better than Aristotle's "the middle character is in all cases to be praised", which gave equal emphasis to all the joys and opportunities of life; which involved "a long steep journey through sunk gorges, over mountain in snow"; which became clear as one progressed; which required Dhamma as its only guide, which was one of advance to a clear goal; which was one of advance to a clear goal; which was no less adventurous than the one pursued by the prince in Kusa Jataka to win back his lost soulmate. His original teaching is so simple and direct that it is irresistible, which is the reason why Buddhism has survived as a world-religion to this day.


Mrs Rhys Davids' clarity of thought and diction, in combination with her deep erudition, have contributed in making this manual unique.


About the Author


Mrs Rhys Davids (27 September 1857 - 26 June 1942), a well-known authority on Buddhism, undertook the difficult task of translating from original Pali a number of Buddhist works which justifiably earned her a place among the foremost scholars of Buddhism. She was a pupil of Prof. T.W. Rhys Davids whom she later married. Besides her translation of the Dhamma-Sangani under the title of A Buddhist Manual of Psychological Ethics, she undertook the translation and interpretation of a number of works on Abhidhamma. As the editor of the Pali Text Society, a number of other works were published under her guidance. She was also the author of a number of books and articles: the more well-known are: Buddhist Psychology, translation of Thera-Therigatha in English verse entitled Psalms of the Early Buddhist Brothers and Sisters, and The Wayfarers' Words (in three Vols.) and What was the Original Gospel in Buddhism?

$30
Essays in Zen Buddhism ( Third Series)Essays in Zen Buddhism ( Third Series)
Essays in Zen Buddhism ( Third Series)

From the Jacket:


In this book the author has tried to trace the relationship which exists between Zen and the two chief Mahayana Sutras the Gandavyuha and Prajnaparamita, and then the transformation, through which Indian Buddhism had to go while adapting itself to Chinese psychology. The Chinese are a practical people quite different from the Indian, who are highly endowed with the power of abstraction as well as an inexhaustible mine of imagination. It was natural that the Mahayana teachings had to be transformed as to make them appreciated by the Chinese. This meant that the Gandavyuha and Prajnaparamita were to be converted into Zen dialogues.


(Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki was Professor of Buddhist Philosophy at the Otani University, Kyoto)


Preface


In this Third Series of Zen Essays I have tried to trace the relationship which exists between Zen and the two chief Mahayana sutras, the Gandavyuha and the Prajnaparamita, and then the transformation through which Indian Buddhism had to go while adapting itself to Chinese psychology. The Chinese are a practical people quite different from the Indian, who are highly endowed with the power of abstraction as well as an inexhaustible mine of imagination. It was natural that the Mahayana teachings had to be so transformed as to make them appreciated by the Chinese. This meant that the Prajnaparamita and the Gandavyuha were to be converted into Zen dialogues.


As regards Zen contributions to Japanese culture, a special volume has been written.1 Apart from Buddhism, apart from Zen after the Kamakura era, Japanese cultural history has no significance, so deeply has Buddhism entered into the lifeblood of the people. My attempt here is merely tentative. The section on 'The Zen Life in Pictures' is also a suggestion; a fuller and more systematic treatment awaits another opportunity.


A few facts are to be mentioned concerning the matter treated in this Series, which have come up while it was in the press. (I) The Tun-huang MS. of the Sayings of Shen-hui mentioned in p. 2 I fn. and p. 37 fn. has already been re-produced in facsimile, while its printed and fully revised edition will be published before long. (2) Dr. Keiki Yabuki has published a book giving detailed explanations of the Tun-huang MSS. collected in his Echoes of the Desert. He supplies us with a wealth of useful information regarding them. (3) All page references to the Gandavyuha are either to the Idzumi MS. or to the R.A.S. one. (4) The Tun-huang MS. of Hui-neng's Tim-ching (p. 15 fn.) will be printed and made accessible to the general public. It will be accompanied by the Koshoji copy of the same. The latter is an old Japanese reprint of the fifteenth or sixteenth century, the Chinese original of which was probably printed some time in the tenth or the eleventh century. Quite likely it is the 'older edition' referred to in a preface to the current edition of the Tan-ching, Its historical importance is beyond dispute.


The author's thanks are, as usual, due to his wife, Beatrice Lane Suzuki, for reviewing the whole MSS. and reading the proofs, and to Mrs. Ruth Fuller Everett, of Chicago, who also kindly read the proofs.


Reference to the generous encouragement of the author's friend, Yakichi Ataka, is not to be omitted just because he is always ready to respond unhesitatingly to all the requests of the author and to make the teachings of Zen Buddhism universally approachable within the limits of literary interpretation.

$28
Eleven Headed Avalokitesvara (Avalokiteshvara)
Eleven Headed Avalokitesvara (Avalokiteshvara)

The Eleven-Headed Avalokitevara is a study of the many origins that may have played a part in arriving at this number of heads, based on forms and powers: male and female forms; origins based on name; in scriptural evidence and images, as well as Hindu deities, and finally origin seen in Rock-cut litanies in caves of India.


Manifold as the sources are, they led to consideration of this Bodhisattva as the highest form of compassion in the widest sense of the word, the savior for humanity of eight to ten dreads, which assail and defeat humankind, especially for exposed travelers, be they pilgrims going to visit and pray at Buddhist shrines, or monks seeking new temples or to find new masters to teach them.


This essay weaves together a panorama in South Asia, moving up to Central Asian and Chinese cultures who contributed their own examples from caves in China (Tun Huang) that also held depositories of paintings brought back to modern cultures for study in Paris and London; long scrolls such as the Yunan Tali Kingdom’s treasure from the late Sung period, all told tales of Buddhist iconography and styles that most often harked back to earlier Indian models.


Korea found influence from China and Japan had the Eleven-Headed in metal and also of lacquer and wood in splendid examples from seventh and eighth centuries on. Still, most astounding is a theory weaving the thread back to the Indian cave litanies, showing how the Bodhisattva as savior caused in practice of art to furnish the model for how the ten scenes of dreads plus the great Avalokitevara’s own face led to an eleven-headed” giants” seen in Indian Gupta styles.


Tove E. Neville is a Buddhist scholar who has spent nine years in research of Eleven-Headed Avalokitevara in Asia. After traveling in more than 30 countries, visiting important sites of both occidental and oriental art, she settled for fifteen years in Japan. While living in the Orient, she examined especially Chinese and Japanese examples of Buddhist art but also made repeated study trips to India and Southeast Asia, and to special oriental art collections and sites in Taiwan, Korea, France, England and Switzerland Intermittently she pursued her graduate studies in oriental art history at the University of Hawaii.


Ms Neville has received initiation in Theravada Buddhism in Thailand, in Tibetan Buddhism in India and in Shingon (Esoteric) Buddhism in Japan, and has practiced these and Zen meditation over a period of twenty-five years.

$70
Sakya or Buddhist Origins
Sakya or Buddhist Origins

About the Book : Sakya or Buddhist Origins by Mrs. Rhys Davids is as relevant today as it was in 1928, the year of its first publication. Time has added to its value. The remarkable progress in the realm of Science has not abated man's yearning for the call of the quest.


As the title implies, its aim is to unravel the genuine message of Gotama, the Buddha, from the accretions in the Pali scriptures, by adopting the techniques of archaeologist. It is divided into two parts. Part one treats of "the discovery, the reconstruction, the rehabilitation of that which, at its birth, was a new and true word from very man to very man, true always and everywhere." Part two tells how this gospel came to be dressed "to suit a monastic set of ideals." An appendix dealing with Pali Pitakas is added.


Over the years, in spite of a large number of books, the horizons of knowledge about Buddhism have remained stationary. This book takes a further step in widening that Knowledge and thus provides an impetus for further research.


About the Author : Mrs. Rhys Davids (27 September 1857 - 26 June 1942), a well-known authority on Buddhism, undertook the difficult task of translating from original Pali a number of Buddhist works which justifiably earned her a place among the foremost scholars of Buddhism. She was a pupil of Prof. T.W. Rhys Davids whom she later married. Besides her translation of the Dhamma-Sangani undertook the translation and interpretation of a number of works on Abhidhamma. As the editor of the Pali Text Society, a number of other works were published under her guidance. She was also the author of a number of books and articles: the more well-known are: Buddhist Psychology, translation of Thera-T

$55
Nagarjuna Revisited: Some Recent Interpretations of His Madhyamaka Philosophy
Nagarjuna Revisited: Some Recent Interpretations of His Madhyamaka Philosophy

The book was originally submitted to Banaras Hindu University in 2012 for the award of Doctor in Philosophy. R.C. Pradhan, Professor of Philosophy from University of Hyderabad, after examining this thesis, writes "... this is an excellent study of the recent interpretations of Nagarjuna's philosophy. This study bears the stamp of deep scholarship in Buddhism, especially in the Madhyamaka philosophy of Nagarjuna. This work covers the vast literature on Nagarjuna's Philosophy and its interpretations by the scholars both Indian and Western and has critically examined all sorts of interpretations from the nihilistic to the absolutistic, logico-linguistic and deconstructionistic. Mr Joy rejects all interpretations with critical and detailed examinations of their viewpoints. His wide survey of literature and deep understanding of the problems posed by them has made him understand Nagarjuna without an intermediary. Nagarjuna's sayings quoted from original sources have put his philosophy in clearer light.... Mr Joy's arguments are convincing and based on wide scholarship. His excellent bibliography is a standing testimony to his wide reading and reflections. He has organized the chapters well with detailed footnotes. He has, on the whole, developed an original approach to the understanding of Nagarjuna's Philosophy of Sunyata...."

$60
The Temples of Bikkavolu
The Temples of Bikkavolu

This book is a pioneering study on the contribution of Eastern Chalukyas to the art and architecture of Andhradesa. Bikkavolu is located in the East Godavari district of Andhra Pradesh where a group of six fine temples are existing. The Bikkavolu temples though not included in the pancharamas, form the earliest group and typical examples of the Dravidian style of architecture in the heart of coastal Andhra. The three temples located on the outskirts of the Bikkavolu village form the early group, with cognate architectural features and the other temples located within the village belong to a later group. On a comparison of the art and architectural features the Early Chalukya and Rastrakuta temples the early group of temples is dated to late ninth century AD, particularly to the reign of Gunaga Vijayaditya (AD 848-92) and the later group to late eleventh century AD, particularly to the reign of Rajaraja Narendra (AD 1022-61) or Vijayaditya VII (AD 1061-75). The work is fully based upon field study of the temples, profusely illustrated with photographs of the temples, the architecture sculpture and iconography along with the ground plans. Printed Pages: 157 with 58 b/w plates.


About the Author:


Dr. S. Nageswara Rao took his M.A., Ph.D. degrees in Ancient History and Archaeology from the Andhra University in 1976 and 1983 respectively. After serving a brief period (1982-85) in the Department of Archaeology and Museums, Government of Andhra Pradesh, he joined the teaching faculty of History and Archaeology of Andhra University, Vishakhapatnam in 1985. He is at present Associate Professor and a member of the P.G. Board of Studies in History and Archaeology. His specialization includes Indian Art and Architecture and Conservation and Museology.


$58
The Buddha Image : Its Origin and Development
The Buddha Image : Its Origin and Development

This a revised edition of the book, first published in 1995. It deals with crucial though controversial question in Buddhist art: the origin of the Buddha image– its transformation from aniconism to anthropomorphism– and the iconography of the Buddha images.


The earliest Buddhist art of Sanchi and Bharhut is anicionic; the Buddha is represented in symbols only. In the later Buddhist art of Gandhara and Mathura, the Buddha is represented in human from; he is the principle subject of sculptural art. The book seeks to explore the geographical area in which the image of the Buddha first emerged and whether ideology of the Buddhist doctrines–Hinayana or Mahayana –had anything to do with this transformation and whether anthropomorphism of the Buddha image is of Greek inspiration.


The Buddha image, as developed eventually at Sarnath, became the model for the Buddha images in whole of Asia–Southeast, Central, and Eastern.


The iconographic features of the Buddha images are superficially an aberration, being in apparent conflict with the doctrine. The Buddha had cut off his hair at the time of his renunciation; the rules of the order enjoin that a monk must be tonsured and must discard and eschew all ornamentation. However, in his images, the Buddha has a luxuriant crop of hair on his head; later he also came to be endowed with a crown and jewels which, strictly speaking, are a taboo for a renunciant.


After an exhaustive examination of the views of various scholar, the book answer these questions and resolves the controversies on the basis of literary, sculptural, numismatic, and epigraphic sources. More importantly, it makes use of the valuable evidence from the contemporaneous and parallel religious tradition–Jainism and jaina art: aniconism of early Jaina art and the iconographic features of later Jaina images. The implications of this study are also important: does India owe idolatry to Buddhism? Was this of foreign inspiration, Greek to be precise? Was the Buddha image fashioned after the Vedic Brahma and whether the Buddha’s usnisa and Buddhist art motifs are rooted in the Vedic tradition?


The book is profusely illustrated and provides rich and stimulating fare to students of Indian art in general and of Buddhist art in particular.


About the Author : Y.Krishan is a scholar in Indology –Indian history, religion, philosophy and art. He has published over 150 research papers on these subjects in leading journals in India and abroad.He has also published a book Audit in India's Democracy.

$65
Hinduism and Buddhism
Hinduism and Buddhism
Ananda Coomaraswamys Hinduism and Buddhism, like all his writings, is a masterpiece. In this work he sets forth his ideas with his usual depth and insight to discard the wrong notions about the divergence in the basic philosophies of these two major religions that have been propounded by European scholars and by Indians trained in our modern skeptical and evolutionary modes of thought. In Hinduism and Buddhism Coomaraswamy has tried to show that the essentials of these religions are the same and form what may be called as the Philosophia Perennis or the Eternal Philosophy. His contention is that Hinduism and Buddhism are not contradictory but the one is a development out of the massive foundation of the other. It is only to those who have made a superficial study that Buddhism seems different from Brahmanism; the more profound is the study, the more difficult it becomes to distinguish Buddhism from Brahmanism.
Hinduism and Buddhism is divided into two parts with copious notes added to each part. In the first part, dealing with Hinduism, Coomaraswamy has examined in detail the fundamental concepts like karma, maya, reincarnation, the darsanas, the sacrifice, social order, etc., and in the second part, dealing with Buddhism, he shows that in essentials it was the same as Hinduism and that Buddha did not strive to establish a new order to restore an older form. In sum, the basic philosophy of great religions is drawn from a common fount and the new religions are but the recognition of the common thought manifested under different forms.

Cover:Hard Cover
Edition : 1996
Publisher : Munshiram Manoharlal Publication Pvt.Ltd
ISBN : 9788121500371
Language : English
Pages : 96
$13
A Bouquet of Indian Heritage, Research and Management
A Bouquet of Indian Heritage, Research and Management
A Bouquet of Indian Heritage, Research and Management
(Dr. Agam Prasad Felicitation Volume) (set in Two Volumes) Editors: Prashant Srivastava Sanjaya Kumar Mahapatra
Dr Agam Prasad is a renowned social worker and Managing Director of Agam Kala Prakashan, Delhi. He was born on 13.10.1949 in the family of Shri Swami Prasad, a renowned advocate. After obtaining his Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Rajasthan, he did his Master’s in Political Science from Meerut University. He wrote his PhD dissertation in History under the guidance of Prof Agam Prasad Mathur, the renowned historian and former Vice-chancellor of Agra University, Agra. He also holds a Post-graduate Diploma in Museology from Bhopal University and MD (H) from Premier Medical College, Chandigarh. All this goes to show his love for knowledge, and his interest in higher education and heritage management. He has dedicated his life to the service of Indology. He has himself authored Rajasthan ki Prachina Rajanitika Samsthaen (Hindi), acted as co-editor of Felicitation Volumes (Triratna, Dimensions of Indian Art, Vajapeya, and Svasti-sri), and published over a dozen research papers. He is the Honorary General-Secretary of the Commonwealth Historians’ Society, and life Member of Indian Association for the Studies of Conservation of Cultural Property, Indian Archaeological Society, Museums Association of India, ICOM, INTACH, Epigraphical Society of India, Plane Name Society of India, Art and Culture Society of India, etc. He is a widely travelled man. The Indian Astro-Palmists Association of India awarded him the title of Hasta Rekha Martanda, and a silver medal.

Prof Prashant Srivastava (BA Honours, MA, PhD, D.Litt) is Head of the Department of Ancient Indian History and Archaeology, University of Lucknow. After he had received his Bachelor’s degree, Master’s degree, both with a first class first, from the University of Lucknow, he was awarded a research fellowship by the U.G.C., and his PhD dissertation on joint, commemorative, and victory coins of ancient India has been widely acclaimed. His DLitt dissertation on foreign elements in ancient Indian coins was also highly appreciated by his learned examiners. He is the recipient of four gold medals—one for BA Honours, two for MA, and one for DLitt. He is the author of twelve books, including Joint Coin-types of Ancient India, Aspects of Ancient Indian Numismatics, Art Motifs on Ancient Indian Coins, The Apracharajas, and Gleanings in Ancient Indian Numismatics, and co-editor of History and Heritage (Essays in Honour of Prof K K Thaplyal). His other publications include about sixty research papers, and over two dozen popular articles. His Encyclopaedia of Indian Coins is the fruit of his endeavours in connection with a major research project, awarded to him by the U.G.C.

Dr Sanjaya Kumar Mahapatra is Principal in Janata College, Kuhuri (Odisha). He has had an illustrious career, devoted to the study of the history, archaeology, and culture. He is the recipient of a number of prestigious awards and honours, like the Rashtriya Gaurava Award of the India International Friendship Society, and the Jyotishvidya Vachaspati Award of the Astrological Foundation, Dinalipi, Behrampur (Odisha). He has recently published Mahisasuramardini in Art, Iconography and Cult Practices, which embodies his PhD dissertation. Besides, he has to his credit, about seventy research papers and articles, published in reputed journals and magazines. He is well-versed in yoga, tantra, and astrology. He was initiated on the path of kirya-yoga by the divine grace of Sri Paramahamsa Hariharananda Giri, the beloved kriya-yoga guru.



$140
Scientific Preservation of Ajanta Murals
Scientific Preservation of Ajanta Murals
This book deals about scientific investigation about mural art of Ajanta reflecting two decades of research. This discovery of Ajanta and measures adopted by various art lovers in early 19th Century at has direct impact on its conservation as detailed in the book. The ancient Indian painting recipe and mural art techniques employed at Ajanta has been incorporated in the book. Detailed studies about nature and characterization of mud mortar of Ajanta / Ellora which support the survival of mural art have been elaborated. The source of raw materials for the preparation of Ajanta / Ellora mud plaster, addition of various aggregates, proteinaceous adhesive and vegetal remains in the plaster for its preparation has been detailed in the book. An elaborative study about the discovery of Cannabis Sativa (Hemp or Bhang) in the mud plaster of Ellora has been discussed. The book also highlights the data for cross sectional study of painted plaster; the analytical data obtained through the instrumental analysis of the pigment and plaster layers using XRF, XRD, FTIR, Raman Spectroscopy, SEM, thermo – hygrograph, Lux meter, Protimeter, Carbon dioxide analyzer, noise meter etc, in details. This detailed investigation has helped in the preparation of matching mud / lime plaster at Ajanta / Ellora for restoration purpose. The impact of visitors on cave murals of Ajanta like variations of temperature, humidity, noise level, carbon dioxide level etc, within the caves besides impact of light on the painted plaster, degradation of murals caused by application shellac varnish, insect activity on the murals have been discussed. The scientific cleaning methods employed at Ajanta for the removal of 19th century shellac coating, soot, dust, dirt etc, from the painted surface has been discussed along with photograph of before / after cleaning activity. The recent cleaning efforts undertaken in the Hinayana cave of Ajanta has been specifically highlighted under unseen Ajanta.

This book also discuss about the application of saline technique for the consolidation of sculpture of Ajanta / Ellora.

About the Author:
Dr. Manager Singh, M. Sc, Ph.D, Superintending Archaeological Chemist, ArchaeologicalSurvey of India, Aurangabad has received his master degree in chemistry from Gorakhpur University and Ph.D in chemistry on “Scientific investigation of Ajanta Paintings and Performance evaluation of materials” from Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University, Aurangabad, Maharashtra. He was associated with the preservation of Ajanta cave murals from 1997 – 2008 and carried out extensive research on the materials and technique of mural art of Ajanta / Ellora. He has published about four dozen research papers in the field of scientific conservation of our art works mostly in international journals. He has been covered extensively by Discovery channel, Japanese T.V and German print media for his innovative work on cleaning of hinayana painting of cave no. 10, Ajanta under unseen Ajanta. Prior to his service in Archaeological Survey of India, he has also served in Geological Survey of India, Bangalore and Naval Science & Technological laboratory, Visakhapatnam. He has been received three months ICCROM training on stone Conservation in Venice on stone conservation and visited many countries to deliver lectures on scientific conservation of Murals in India and characterization of ancient materials with the help of scientific analysis for synthesis of compatible restoration materials.
$72
The Monuments of Sanchi set in three vols.
The Monuments of Sanchi set in three vols.
The Monuments of Sanchi, the magnum opus of Marshall and Foucher, is the result of painstaking exposition of the monuments, their assessment and description which is a signal service rendered to Indian culture in general and Buddhist art and architecture in particular. This monumental work by Marshall and Foucher is in three volumes. The present reprint, is reduced to almost two-thirds of the original size without impairing in any manner ts original quality. This would prove to be a real boon to students of Indology and Indian Culture, art historians, critics and archaeologists as well.
$135
Buddhist Art & Culture: Symbols & Significance (Set of two vols.)
Buddhist Art & Culture: Symbols & Significance (Set of two vols.)
Roman Diaspora in the making of India thrived on a syncrtic goddess ushered by the Greco-Buddhist reliquary cult. Lustrated by royal elephant identified with Africa, goddess Gajalakshmi on lotus of rebirth coexists with Isis-Venus and Nemesis symbolized by the Wheel of Low (Retribution), winged griffin and other rebus memory devices .Metaphors originally distilled faith in afterlife but these necromantic signs are now translated as Buddha’s external presence in a neural religion. Unprecedented cult images of goddess invoked as Maha Maya (Mega Maia) and Maha Vuhara Devi on the Great Boat (Mahayana) radically transformed the cultural landscape of South Asia. Subject to Influences, Meaning of art correlated with Mystery religions moved eastward from the Mediterranean to reach the gateway to heaven (Torana).The search for immortality demonstrates inter-connectedness of all art objects from Gandhara to Sri Lanka giving to ample scope for portraiture, Narrative techniques and symbolic Communication. Backed by new mortuary practices and esoteric rituals magic of art and new Brahmi script invented from invented from Aramaic was crucial to afterlife. Not surprisingly Tamil Brami on pot shards was found in Berenike and Oman. The two Volumes examine Late- synthesis in order to create new premises for investigating its Greco-Roman past centered on the powerful impulse to ti induces descent of the Lord (Bhagavato ukramti) through Immaculate conception and ambiguity in its cultural moorings. In the process, patrons, priest-kings and historical figures emerge as contributor to the obscure space of the funerary cult. Lasting less than four centuries in India, veneration of luminous Buddhas had far reaching consequences in Asia. Simultaneously, transcending human limitations goddess Mahalakshmi is singular witness to transformations through two millennia of Indian civilization.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Art Historian ArputhaRani Sengupta (born June 14, 1947) examines semiotics of iconography with wide range of meaning in the South and Central Asian Buddhist cultures in the milieu of Greco-Roman world. Her primary interest is to study the ways in which trans-cultural non-linguistic phenomena in art history can generate meaning and provide information on the role of cultural synthesis and knowledge production. Her powerful deductive Alternate History is a new form of empiricism that reveals synthesis of heterodox beliefs and philosophy in the Greco-Buddhist reliquary art and cult during the early Christian era. The former Professor at National Museum Institute, New Delhi and Stella Maris College, Chennai is adjunct faculty in the Delhi Institute of Research and Heritage Management. Sengupta has undertaken cross-disciplinary research on prehistoric and early historic burial goods in South Asia and on Buddist Symbole and Substitute with research grant from the Ministry of Culture and Indian Council for Historical Research. Publications include Art of Terracotta: Cult and Cultural Synthesis in India (2004), Jewellery from Buddha Zone in Central and South Asia (2012), Kailasanatha Temple. The Realm of Immortals (2009), and Makimekalai: Dancer with Magic Bowl (2005). Edited volumes include Cult of the Goddess (2012) and Devaraja Cult in South and Southeast Asia (2004).
$135
The Isvarapratyabhijnakarika of Utpaladeva
The Isvarapratyabhijnakarika of Utpaladeva
The Isvarapratyabhijnakarika IPK of Utpaladeva is the foundation stone of the Pratyabhijna school and constitutes the main theoretical framework of the Trika. It is the most important philosophical work of non-dual tantric Shaivism as a whole. Utpaladeva devoted two commentaries to his IPK a vrtti and a tika . According to Abhinavagupta the IPK and the vrtti thereon were composed by Utpaladeva at the same time. This makes the vrtti and indispenable tool to grasp the original meaning of the difficult karikas of the Isvarapratyabhijna. UNfortunately all vrtti manuscripts from Kashmir broke at the same point and consequently so did the edition published in the Kashmir Series of Texts and Studies in 1918.

Utpaladeva devoted two commentaries to his IPK, a vrtti and a tika or vivæti (now almost totally lost). According to Abhinavagupta, the IPK and the vætti thereon were composed by

Utpaladeva at the same time. This makes the vætti an indispensable tool to grasp the original meaning of the difficult karikas of the Isvarapratyabhijna. The present book, originally published in the Serie Orientale Roma (IsMEO), contains the first critical edition of the IPK and, for the first time, the complete text of the vrtti on the basis of a unique Malayalam manuscript discovered in Trivandrum Library by R. Torella, who has also made use of the other incomplete manuscripts from Kashmir. The edition is accompanied by an English translation with copious exegetical notes, which highlight the connections of Utpaladevaís thought with the coeval schools of Indian philosophy and, first of all, with the Buddhist pramana tradition.
$45
Buddhist Sculptural Art of Krishna Valley
Buddhist Sculptural Art of Krishna Valley
Krishna is one of the most prominent river of peninsular India.It forms a large and fertile land. The convenient navigational approach to sea through Krishna helped in flourishing number of urban settlements like Amaravati, Nagarjunakonda, Goli, Jaggayepetta, Chezarla, Ghantasala, Gummadidurru, Bhattiprolu. The river also encouraged the rulers and traders of this region to influence the polity, economy and culture through maritime relations in far East Asian region.The political and economic stability attained during six centuries from 300 BC to 300 AD helped the inhabitants in motivating to offer sizable amount of donations in order to establish Buddhist embellishments. The region was occupied by both Mahasanghikas and Mahisasaka sect of Buddhism for long time which encouraged large monastic and laity activities in this region. Hence consequently an impressive number of Stupas and Viharas were established in this region. The stupas of lower Krishna region provides a good number of representations related to Buddhism in accordance to primary objective of Buddhist sculptural art but also projects an extensive glimpse of contemporary life of inhabitants. This work Buddhist Sculptural Art of the Lower Krishna Valley intends to present most important Buddhist narratives of lower Krishna region at one place. The work intends to make a comparative study of Buddhist narratives and their repetitive presentations at various Buddhist sites. The symbolic and anthropomorphic presentations of Buddha, manifestation of Buddha and related Deities, important scenes from life of Buddha, Jataka stories are main themes which are given due importance in the volume. The work also attempts to reconstruct the contemporary life of people living in this region during first three centuries of AD.
$48
Buddhist Mahayana Texts (SBE Vol. 49)
Buddhist Mahayana Texts (SBE Vol. 49)
This is a subset of the Sacred Books of the East Series which includes translations of all the most important works of the seven non-Christian religions which have exercised a profound influence on the civilizations of the continent of Asia. The works have been translated by leading authorities in their field.
$26
Buddhist Suttas (SBE Vol. 11)
Buddhist Suttas (SBE Vol. 11)
These seven scriptural writings are considered to be the most important and oldest of the Buddhist religion. Originally written in the Pali language, they date to the fourth and third centuries BC. This early date is what makes them so important —they form the very core of Buddhist teachings, sought after and studied by monks and scholars for centuries.
$22
The Dhammapada and Suttanipata (SBE Vol. 10)
The Dhammapada and Suttanipata (SBE Vol. 10)
The Dhammapada and Suttanipata (SBE Vol. 10): A Collection of Verses, Being One of the Canonical Books of the Buddhists
$26
The Questions of King Milinda (SBE Vol. 35)
The Questions of King Milinda (SBE Vol. 35)
The present book being an English translation of a German book entitled Der Saiva Siddhanta by H.W. Schomerus gives a full and documented account of this theistic movement then as now little known in the West. The book quickly became and still is the major reference work in this field in any European language.
$24
The Saddharma-Pundarika (SBE Vol.21)
The Saddharma-Pundarika (SBE Vol.21)
One of the nine Dharmas of the Mahayana Buddhism; deals with the state of things in the present, past and future according to Mahayana philosophy.
$28

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