Evergreen Tree Kalamkari Painting

Evergreen Tree Kalamkari Painting

$25.00 USD

The evergreen kalamkari painting depicts a tree where a number of birds are dancing. The borders are marked by lot of floral designs and natural colour pattersn are nicely made use of in this specatcular painting.


Kalamkari is a type of hand-painted or block-printed cotton textile. The word is derived from the Persian words kalam (pen) and kari (craftmanship), meaning drawing with a pen.


The Machilipatnam Kalamkari craft made at Pedana near by Machilipatnam in Andhra Pradesh, evolved with patronage of the Mughals and the Golconda sultanate.


There are two styles of kalamkari painting in India - one, the Srikalahasti style and the other, the Machilipatnam style. The Srikalahasti style of Kalamkari, wherein the "kalam" or pen is used for free hand drawing of the subject and filling in the colours, is purely hand-worked. This style flourished around temples and so had an almost religious tinge - scrolls, temple hangings, chariot banners and the like, depicted deities and scenes taken from the great Hindu epics - Ramayana. Mahabarata, Puranas and the mythological classics. This style owes its present status to Smt. Only natural dyes are used in Kalamkari and it involves seventeen painstaking steps.


The cotton fabric gets its glossiness by immersing it for an hour in a mixture of Myrobalans and cow milk. Contours and reasons are then drawn with a point in bamboo soaked in a mixture of jagri fermented and water; one by one these are applied, then the vegetable dyes. After applying each color on to the motif, the Kalamkari fabric is washed after drying. Thus, each fabric can undergo up to 20 washes. Various effects are obtained by using cow dung, seeds, plants and crushed flowers to obtain natural dye.

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The evergreen kalamkari painting depicts a tree where a number of birds are dancing. The borders are marked by lot of floral designs and natural colour pattersn are nicely made use of in this specatcular painting.


Kalamkari is a type of hand-painted or block-printed cotton textile. The word is derived from the Persian words kalam (pen) and kari (craftmanship), meaning drawing with a pen.


The Machilipatnam Kalamkari craft made at Pedana near by Machilipatnam in Andhra Pradesh, evolved with patronage of the Mughals and the Golconda sultanate.


There are two styles of kalamkari painting in India - one, the Srikalahasti style and the other, the Machilipatnam style. The Srikalahasti style of Kalamkari, wherein the "kalam" or pen is used for free hand drawing of the subject and filling in the colours, is purely hand-worked. This style flourished around temples and so had an almost religious tinge - scrolls, temple hangings, chariot banners and the like, depicted deities and scenes taken from the great Hindu epics - Ramayana. Mahabarata, Puranas and the mythological classics. This style owes its present status to Smt. Only natural dyes are used in Kalamkari and it involves seventeen painstaking steps.


The cotton fabric gets its glossiness by immersing it for an hour in a mixture of Myrobalans and cow milk. Contours and reasons are then drawn with a point in bamboo soaked in a mixture of jagri fermented and water; one by one these are applied, then the vegetable dyes. After applying each color on to the motif, the Kalamkari fabric is washed after drying. Thus, each fabric can undergo up to 20 washes. Various effects are obtained by using cow dung, seeds, plants and crushed flowers to obtain natural dye.

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