Lord Jhulelal - Marble Painting

Lord Jhulelal - Marble Painting

$100.00

The spectacular marble painting depicts the god of river in a most accomplished manner. The god is preaching and his turban is given a resplendent touch. Jhulelal is the community God of the people of Sindh province, now in Pakistan.


Around 10th cen AD, Sindh came under the rule of neighbouring Muslim ruled Samras. Mirkshah, a Muslim ruler of Samara, who was not only a tyrant but also a religious fanatic, ordered all the Hindu leaders either to convert or face death. Frightened at the order, they pleaded some more time.


They approached Lord Varuna seeking his help. They prayed for 15 days and following his blessing their saviour was born. Jhulelal, the river deity was born in the womb of Devki Devi.


When the new born opened his mouth, there flowed the Sindhu river with an old man sitting cross-legged on a pala fish, a fish that always swims against the current. The child was named Udaichand. He was also called Uderolal ('one who has sprung from water'). People lovingly called the child Amarlal (immortal) child and the cradle where the little one rested began to sway to and fro on its own. Hence he came to be called Jhulelal or the swinging child. Soon after the child's birth Mata Devki died. A little later Ratanchand remarried.


Soon Mirkshah came to learn about the new born, who once again summoned the Hindu leaders. They again pleaded more time and informed him that their saviour was none other than the water god himself. Mirkshah sent one of his ministers Ahirio to inquire about the child. He took along a rose dipped in deadly poison.


Ahirio was bemused by the very dazzling nature of the child. He hesitatingly gave the rose to the child. However, the child blew away the flower with a single breath.


To Ahirio's astonishment, the child changed into an old man with a long beard. Again the old man turned into a boy of sixteen. And then he saw Uderolal on horseback with a blazing sword in his hand. There were row upon row warriors behind him. A frightened Ahirio bagged for mercy.


On his return Ahirio narrated the miraculous happening to Mirkshah. Mirkshah didn't believe him. But he too was afraid as that very night he dreamed a dreadful dream. A child was sitting on his neck, who changed himself to an old man with a long beard. And again to a warrior with a drawn sword confronting Mirkshah on the battlefield.


Ultimately, Mirkesh realised his folly and agreed to treat both Muslims and Hindus as his fellows.


Jhulelal continues to be the unifying force and the centre of all cultural activities of the Sindhi community.

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The spectacular marble painting depicts the god of river in a most accomplished manner. The god is preaching and his turban is given a resplendent touch. Jhulelal is the community God of the people of Sindh province, now in Pakistan.


Around 10th cen AD, Sindh came under the rule of neighbouring Muslim ruled Samras. Mirkshah, a Muslim ruler of Samara, who was not only a tyrant but also a religious fanatic, ordered all the Hindu leaders either to convert or face death. Frightened at the order, they pleaded some more time.


They approached Lord Varuna seeking his help. They prayed for 15 days and following his blessing their saviour was born. Jhulelal, the river deity was born in the womb of Devki Devi.


When the new born opened his mouth, there flowed the Sindhu river with an old man sitting cross-legged on a pala fish, a fish that always swims against the current. The child was named Udaichand. He was also called Uderolal ('one who has sprung from water'). People lovingly called the child Amarlal (immortal) child and the cradle where the little one rested began to sway to and fro on its own. Hence he came to be called Jhulelal or the swinging child. Soon after the child's birth Mata Devki died. A little later Ratanchand remarried.


Soon Mirkshah came to learn about the new born, who once again summoned the Hindu leaders. They again pleaded more time and informed him that their saviour was none other than the water god himself. Mirkshah sent one of his ministers Ahirio to inquire about the child. He took along a rose dipped in deadly poison.


Ahirio was bemused by the very dazzling nature of the child. He hesitatingly gave the rose to the child. However, the child blew away the flower with a single breath.


To Ahirio's astonishment, the child changed into an old man with a long beard. Again the old man turned into a boy of sixteen. And then he saw Uderolal on horseback with a blazing sword in his hand. There were row upon row warriors behind him. A frightened Ahirio bagged for mercy.


On his return Ahirio narrated the miraculous happening to Mirkshah. Mirkshah didn't believe him. But he too was afraid as that very night he dreamed a dreadful dream. A child was sitting on his neck, who changed himself to an old man with a long beard. And again to a warrior with a drawn sword confronting Mirkshah on the battlefield.


Ultimately, Mirkesh realised his folly and agreed to treat both Muslims and Hindus as his fellows.


Jhulelal continues to be the unifying force and the centre of all cultural activities of the Sindhi community.

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