'Mighty Garuda' Brass Statue

'Mighty Garuda' Brass Statue

$48.00

The beautiful brass figure of the mount of Vishnu is given a royal and refine treatment. He is praying His Lord with folded hands. His wings, headgear and other parts of the body are treated with minute detail and some exquisite carvings. A large mythical bird figure that appears in both Hindu and Buddhist mythology, Garuda is shown with a golden body, wings, and an eagle's beak, but with a man's body. The mount of Vishnu wears a crown on his head. In the Bhagavad-Gita, at the battlefield of Kurukshetra, Lord Krishna explaining his omnipresence to Arjun, says: “Of birds, I am the son of Vineeta (Garuda)” indicating the importance of Garuda.The mighty bird plays a seminal role in Vishnu's incarnation, in which Lord Krishna and Satyabhama ride on Garuda to kill Narakasura, a demon. Garuda’s father was the sage Kasyapa, mother Vinata. Her sister was Kadru, the mother of serpents. Garuda’s mother once lost a bet and as a result became enslaved to her sister. Resolving to release his mother from this state of bondage, Garuda approached the serpents. They wanted Garuda to bring them the elixir of immortality, also called amrita, in the possession of the gods. The gods guarded it jealously, since it was the source of their immortality. They had ringed the elixir with a massive fire that covered the sky. But Garuda could overcome all odds and bring elixir for the serpents. Garuda defeated the Gods. Taking the water of many rivers into his mouth, he extinguished the protective fire the gods had thrown up. En route, he encountered Vishnu. Rather than fight, the two exchanged promises. Vishnu promised Garuda the gift of immortality even without drinking from the elixir, and Garuda promised to become Vishnu's mount. Flying onward, he met Indra the god of the sky. Garuda promised that once he had delivered the elixir, thus fulfilling the request of the serpents, he would make it possible for Indra to get possession of the elixir again. Indra in turn promised Garuda the serpents as food. Garuda alighted in front of the waiting serpents. Placing the elixir on the grass, and thereby liberating his mother Vinata from her servitude, he urged the serpents to perform their religious ablutions before consuming it. As they hurried off to do so, Indra swooped in to make off with the elixir. From that day onward, Garuda was the ally of the gods and the trusty mount of Vishnu, as well as the cruel enemy of serpents. He preyed upon them at every opportunity.

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The beautiful brass figure of the mount of Vishnu is given a royal and refine treatment. He is praying His Lord with folded hands. His wings, headgear and other parts of the body are treated with minute detail and some exquisite carvings. A large mythical bird figure that appears in both Hindu and Buddhist mythology, Garuda is shown with a golden body, wings, and an eagle's beak, but with a man's body. The mount of Vishnu wears a crown on his head. In the Bhagavad-Gita, at the battlefield of Kurukshetra, Lord Krishna explaining his omnipresence to Arjun, says: “Of birds, I am the son of Vineeta (Garuda)” indicating the importance of Garuda.The mighty bird plays a seminal role in Vishnu's incarnation, in which Lord Krishna and Satyabhama ride on Garuda to kill Narakasura, a demon. Garuda’s father was the sage Kasyapa, mother Vinata. Her sister was Kadru, the mother of serpents. Garuda’s mother once lost a bet and as a result became enslaved to her sister. Resolving to release his mother from this state of bondage, Garuda approached the serpents. They wanted Garuda to bring them the elixir of immortality, also called amrita, in the possession of the gods. The gods guarded it jealously, since it was the source of their immortality. They had ringed the elixir with a massive fire that covered the sky. But Garuda could overcome all odds and bring elixir for the serpents. Garuda defeated the Gods. Taking the water of many rivers into his mouth, he extinguished the protective fire the gods had thrown up. En route, he encountered Vishnu. Rather than fight, the two exchanged promises. Vishnu promised Garuda the gift of immortality even without drinking from the elixir, and Garuda promised to become Vishnu's mount. Flying onward, he met Indra the god of the sky. Garuda promised that once he had delivered the elixir, thus fulfilling the request of the serpents, he would make it possible for Indra to get possession of the elixir again. Indra in turn promised Garuda the serpents as food. Garuda alighted in front of the waiting serpents. Placing the elixir on the grass, and thereby liberating his mother Vinata from her servitude, he urged the serpents to perform their religious ablutions before consuming it. As they hurried off to do so, Indra swooped in to make off with the elixir. From that day onward, Garuda was the ally of the gods and the trusty mount of Vishnu, as well as the cruel enemy of serpents. He preyed upon them at every opportunity.

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