Pearls of Love - Japa Mala Necklace

Pearls of Love - Japa Mala Necklace

$48.00
Here fresh water pearls are put together to create a beautiful japa mala necklace. Such pearls have immense spiritual value as japa malas are used to ward off evil spirits and to increase concentration power. A Japa mala is a set of beads usually made from 108 beads. Malas are used for counting while reciting, chanting, or repeating a mantra or the name or names of a deity. This practice is known in Sanskrit as japa. Mantras are repeated hundreds or even thousands of times during meditation. Mala is used to focus on the meaning of the mantra rather than counting its repetitions. One repetition is usually said for each bead while turning the thumb clockwise around each bead. Counting should always begin with a bead next to the sumeru. In the Hindu, Vedic tradition, if more than one mala of repetitions is to be done, one changes directions when reaching the sumeru rather than crossing it.The figure 108 represent the entire universe. When we count the mantra using the mala, we are remembering the presence of the deity who is the Universal Self in every part of the universe. So, after each cycle of repetition, we cover the entire universe by feeling and touching the presence of deity of the mantra in it.108 beads symbolize the universe and repetition on each reminds us the omnipresence of the Universal Self (God). It suggests the immanent nature of the Universal Self
Add to wishlist $48.00" />
Share with Share with
Here fresh water pearls are put together to create a beautiful japa mala necklace. Such pearls have immense spiritual value as japa malas are used to ward off evil spirits and to increase concentration power. A Japa mala is a set of beads usually made from 108 beads. Malas are used for counting while reciting, chanting, or repeating a mantra or the name or names of a deity. This practice is known in Sanskrit as japa. Mantras are repeated hundreds or even thousands of times during meditation. Mala is used to focus on the meaning of the mantra rather than counting its repetitions. One repetition is usually said for each bead while turning the thumb clockwise around each bead. Counting should always begin with a bead next to the sumeru. In the Hindu, Vedic tradition, if more than one mala of repetitions is to be done, one changes directions when reaching the sumeru rather than crossing it.The figure 108 represent the entire universe. When we count the mantra using the mala, we are remembering the presence of the deity who is the Universal Self in every part of the universe. So, after each cycle of repetition, we cover the entire universe by feeling and touching the presence of deity of the mantra in it.108 beads symbolize the universe and repetition on each reminds us the omnipresence of the Universal Self (God). It suggests the immanent nature of the Universal Self

Recently Viewed Products

We Accept