Seated Lord Dhanvantari Holding Pot of Celestial Ambrosia

Seated Lord Dhanvantari Holding Pot of Celestial Ambrosia

$155.00
In this spectacular figure Lord Vishnu in his incarnation as Lord Dhanvantari is holding a pot of celestial ambrosia. In his heart shines a subtle and pleasing blaze of light that also shines around his head and lotus eyes. His body is luminous, splendid, and shining.
According to the Charaka Samhita, the knowledge of Ayurveda is eternal and is revealed in each of the cycles of creation of the universe. Lord Vishnu incarnates as Lord Dhanvantari and reestablishes the tradition of Ayurveda in the world to help relieve some of humanity’s suffering.
Lord Dhanvantari is also known as the father of Ayurveda as he was the first divine incarnation to impart its wisdom amongst humans. Lord Dhanvantari first appeared during the great churning of the cosmic ocean of milk (Samudra manthan) to deliver amrit (ambrosia, or Divine nectar) to the demigods.
The churning of the ocean of milk constitutes a well-known episode in the Puranas. This episode reminds us about our spiritual endeavor to attain self-realization through concentration of mind, withdrawal of the senses, control of all desires, austerities and asceticism. This endeavor is celebrated every twelve years in the holy festival known as Kumbha Mela.
There is an interesting story is related in the Srimad Bhagavatam.
Using the mountain Mandara as the rod and Vasuki the serpent as the cord, both demigods and demons proceeded to churn the ocean of milk. All kinds of herbs were cast into it. The churning was so arduous that Lord Vishnu had to appear in many forms to help them with this process and prevent it from going nowhere.
The churning of the ocean of milk first produced a deadly poison (halahala) that only Lord Shiva could swallow. And so he did, except that his consort Parvati pressed his neck as he was swallowing, so that the poison would not reach his stomach, and the halahala stayed in Lord Shiva’s throat, changing the colour of his neck to blue due to its potency. This is why Lord Shiva is also called Neelakantha, or the blue-necked one.
During the churning, many Divine objects and beings emerged from the ocean, including Kamadhenu (the wish fulfilling cow), Ucchaisrava (the white horse), Airavata (the white elephant), Kaustubhamani (a rare diamond), Kalpavriksha (the wish fulfilling tree), and Shri Laxmi, the Goddess of Wealth, who after being worshipped by all Gods, demigods, asuras and everyone else present, was reunited with her husband Lord Vishnu after having been separated for many ages.
As the churning continued, Lord Dhanvantari appeared. A young and well-built, his chest was very broad and his complexion bluish black. With strong arms, reddish eyes, he moved like a lion. He was clad in bright yellow, his curly hair was anointed with oil and he wore shining earrings made of pearl. As he emerged, he was holding a conch, leeches, healing herbs, a chakra (one of the divine weapons of Lord Vishnu’s), and the long sought pot of ambrosia, for which he is also called Sudha Pani (“carrying nectar”). The asuras, greedy after all things, realized right away that the container was full of nectar and snatched it from him. The demons started quarreling about which of them would drink the nectar first, grabbing the pot from one another and behaving like rogues. Taking advantages of the unruly behavior of the demons, Lord Vishnu appeared as Mohini, a beautiful woman to fascinate them and soon recovered the nectar from them. The Lord then distributed the nectar only amongst the demigods.
After drinking the nectar, they were invigorated with energy and defeated the demons.
Lord Vishnu predicted that Lord Dhanvantari would appear again in the world to teach men the science of Ayurveda.
The scriptures say that “One who remembers the name of Dhanvantari can be released from all disease.” Lord Dhanvantari is worshipped all over India as the God of Medicine. Even today, two days before Diwali, people worship Lord Dhanvantari. At dusk, a lamp pointing toward North by North-East is lit at the doorstep of the house to welcome Lord Dhanvantari for health and happiness in life. This day is known as Dhanteras (or Dhanwantari Triodasi, or Dhantrayodashi).
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In this spectacular figure Lord Vishnu in his incarnation as Lord Dhanvantari is holding a pot of celestial ambrosia. In his heart shines a subtle and pleasing blaze of light that also shines around his head and lotus eyes. His body is luminous, splendid, and shining.
According to the Charaka Samhita, the knowledge of Ayurveda is eternal and is revealed in each of the cycles of creation of the universe. Lord Vishnu incarnates as Lord Dhanvantari and reestablishes the tradition of Ayurveda in the world to help relieve some of humanity’s suffering.
Lord Dhanvantari is also known as the father of Ayurveda as he was the first divine incarnation to impart its wisdom amongst humans. Lord Dhanvantari first appeared during the great churning of the cosmic ocean of milk (Samudra manthan) to deliver amrit (ambrosia, or Divine nectar) to the demigods.
The churning of the ocean of milk constitutes a well-known episode in the Puranas. This episode reminds us about our spiritual endeavor to attain self-realization through concentration of mind, withdrawal of the senses, control of all desires, austerities and asceticism. This endeavor is celebrated every twelve years in the holy festival known as Kumbha Mela.
There is an interesting story is related in the Srimad Bhagavatam.
Using the mountain Mandara as the rod and Vasuki the serpent as the cord, both demigods and demons proceeded to churn the ocean of milk. All kinds of herbs were cast into it. The churning was so arduous that Lord Vishnu had to appear in many forms to help them with this process and prevent it from going nowhere.
The churning of the ocean of milk first produced a deadly poison (halahala) that only Lord Shiva could swallow. And so he did, except that his consort Parvati pressed his neck as he was swallowing, so that the poison would not reach his stomach, and the halahala stayed in Lord Shiva’s throat, changing the colour of his neck to blue due to its potency. This is why Lord Shiva is also called Neelakantha, or the blue-necked one.
During the churning, many Divine objects and beings emerged from the ocean, including Kamadhenu (the wish fulfilling cow), Ucchaisrava (the white horse), Airavata (the white elephant), Kaustubhamani (a rare diamond), Kalpavriksha (the wish fulfilling tree), and Shri Laxmi, the Goddess of Wealth, who after being worshipped by all Gods, demigods, asuras and everyone else present, was reunited with her husband Lord Vishnu after having been separated for many ages.
As the churning continued, Lord Dhanvantari appeared. A young and well-built, his chest was very broad and his complexion bluish black. With strong arms, reddish eyes, he moved like a lion. He was clad in bright yellow, his curly hair was anointed with oil and he wore shining earrings made of pearl. As he emerged, he was holding a conch, leeches, healing herbs, a chakra (one of the divine weapons of Lord Vishnu’s), and the long sought pot of ambrosia, for which he is also called Sudha Pani (“carrying nectar”). The asuras, greedy after all things, realized right away that the container was full of nectar and snatched it from him. The demons started quarreling about which of them would drink the nectar first, grabbing the pot from one another and behaving like rogues. Taking advantages of the unruly behavior of the demons, Lord Vishnu appeared as Mohini, a beautiful woman to fascinate them and soon recovered the nectar from them. The Lord then distributed the nectar only amongst the demigods.
After drinking the nectar, they were invigorated with energy and defeated the demons.
Lord Vishnu predicted that Lord Dhanvantari would appear again in the world to teach men the science of Ayurveda.
The scriptures say that “One who remembers the name of Dhanvantari can be released from all disease.” Lord Dhanvantari is worshipped all over India as the God of Medicine. Even today, two days before Diwali, people worship Lord Dhanvantari. At dusk, a lamp pointing toward North by North-East is lit at the doorstep of the house to welcome Lord Dhanvantari for health and happiness in life. This day is known as Dhanteras (or Dhanwantari Triodasi, or Dhantrayodashi).

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