The Bharadvajas in Ancient India

The Bharadvajas in Ancient India

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From the Jacket

The Book Comprises two parts: Part I deals with the socio-historical aspects of family of the Vedic Seer Bharadvaja, and Part II discusses the significant contribution the family has made to the various fields of Indian culture. Part I is divided into five chapters, each comprising more than one section. The first chapter considers the textual evidences of the Vedic Sazhhitãs, the Brahmaas, the Upaniads and the Ramayaa in regard to the Bharadvãjas. The second chapter traces the birth and parentage, of Bharadvaja, the progenitor, and his relation with the gods, seers, kings and other persons. The third chapter discusses the lives of the descendants of Bharadvaja, namely Suhotra, unahotra, Nara, Garga, jivan, Payu, Rãtri (Kaipa), Vasu, Väsa, Sirirhbitha, Ajamidha and Purumidha. The fourth chapter deals with two other seers Samyu, a brother of Bharadvãja and Vitahavya Angirasa, whose hymns are incorporated in the Book of Bharadvaja in the gveda. The fifth chapter deals with the problem of Divc’dasa, a Bharata Prince, with whom the Uharadvajas were intimately connected as priests.


Part II is divided into two chapters: The chapter six takes the Vedic themes namely, Puan: myth and cult, family hymns of Bharadvajas, Gosukta, the Samans of Bharadvajas and Bharadvaja KalpasUtra. The chapter seven relates to the contribution of the Bharadvãjas to the fields of Politics, Grammar and Phonetics, medicine and philosophy of Pancarãtra. Besides, the two appendices list the Gotras and Pravaras of the Bharadvajas.


Introduction

A study of the Vedic culture would involve a consideration of number of its aspects viz., its mythology, religion, philosophy, popular beliefs and superstitions, socio-political institutions and so on. All these aspects show their gradual development as the Indo-Aryans (IA) kept on coming into this land in a number of waves of migrations and spread eastward in different settlements. These IA settlers lived in some scattered, even isolated, settle- ments and developed their own distinct family traditions, keeping, however, certain affinities with tradition of other families. This can be gathered from the hymns of the family Mandalas of the RV, which are the earliest production in the world's litera- ture; it is primarily a religious work, containing, of course, some historical traces-particularly in the so-called Danastutis, the references in which to personal names, etc. may be said to be contemporary records of the age.


The RV consists of a thousand and odd hymns which are divided into ten Mandalas based on historical tradition." The Mandalas 2-7 are called Family Books (Kula Mandalas], i.e. collections of the hymns by seers belonging to particular families. These families are: Grtsamada, Visvamitra, Vamadeva, Atri, Bharadvaja and Vasistha. The eighth Mandala contains hymns revealed to the members of the Kanva family and the Angirases. The first Mandala, too, is based on the same criterion, but it may be called a collection of the hymns of seers belonging to more than one family, and hence could be called a collection of smaller family books. The 9th and the l0th Mandalas do not fall in the line with these Mandalas....

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From the Jacket

The Book Comprises two parts: Part I deals with the socio-historical aspects of family of the Vedic Seer Bharadvaja, and Part II discusses the significant contribution the family has made to the various fields of Indian culture. Part I is divided into five chapters, each comprising more than one section. The first chapter considers the textual evidences of the Vedic Sazhhitãs, the Brahmaas, the Upaniads and the Ramayaa in regard to the Bharadvãjas. The second chapter traces the birth and parentage, of Bharadvaja, the progenitor, and his relation with the gods, seers, kings and other persons. The third chapter discusses the lives of the descendants of Bharadvaja, namely Suhotra, unahotra, Nara, Garga, jivan, Payu, Rãtri (Kaipa), Vasu, Väsa, Sirirhbitha, Ajamidha and Purumidha. The fourth chapter deals with two other seers Samyu, a brother of Bharadvãja and Vitahavya Angirasa, whose hymns are incorporated in the Book of Bharadvaja in the gveda. The fifth chapter deals with the problem of Divc’dasa, a Bharata Prince, with whom the Uharadvajas were intimately connected as priests.


Part II is divided into two chapters: The chapter six takes the Vedic themes namely, Puan: myth and cult, family hymns of Bharadvajas, Gosukta, the Samans of Bharadvajas and Bharadvaja KalpasUtra. The chapter seven relates to the contribution of the Bharadvãjas to the fields of Politics, Grammar and Phonetics, medicine and philosophy of Pancarãtra. Besides, the two appendices list the Gotras and Pravaras of the Bharadvajas.


Introduction

A study of the Vedic culture would involve a consideration of number of its aspects viz., its mythology, religion, philosophy, popular beliefs and superstitions, socio-political institutions and so on. All these aspects show their gradual development as the Indo-Aryans (IA) kept on coming into this land in a number of waves of migrations and spread eastward in different settlements. These IA settlers lived in some scattered, even isolated, settle- ments and developed their own distinct family traditions, keeping, however, certain affinities with tradition of other families. This can be gathered from the hymns of the family Mandalas of the RV, which are the earliest production in the world's litera- ture; it is primarily a religious work, containing, of course, some historical traces-particularly in the so-called Danastutis, the references in which to personal names, etc. may be said to be contemporary records of the age.


The RV consists of a thousand and odd hymns which are divided into ten Mandalas based on historical tradition." The Mandalas 2-7 are called Family Books (Kula Mandalas], i.e. collections of the hymns by seers belonging to particular families. These families are: Grtsamada, Visvamitra, Vamadeva, Atri, Bharadvaja and Vasistha. The eighth Mandala contains hymns revealed to the members of the Kanva family and the Angirases. The first Mandala, too, is based on the same criterion, but it may be called a collection of the hymns of seers belonging to more than one family, and hence could be called a collection of smaller family books. The 9th and the l0th Mandalas do not fall in the line with these Mandalas....

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