The Essentials of Indian Philosophy

The Essentials of Indian Philosophy

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The present work is a simpler and shorter account of the author's previously published Outline of Indian Philosophy. Therefore, in accordance with the aim kept in view in writing, it leaves out many of the details included in the previous one. The difference between them, however, does not consist merely in these omissions: There is also variation in the treatment of some topics, as, for instance, in the first two chapters dealing with early Indian thought. At least in two cases, again, there are important additions. In the earlier book, Buddhism was dealt with in reference to two stages of its growth. There is a third phase, representing the doctrine as it was originally taught by Buddha; and a brief resume of it, as it has been reconstructed by scholars in recent years, also finds a place here. Similarly, the account of the Vedanta has been amplified by the inclusion of the Dvaita system of it. In treating of such a subject as Indian Philosophy, it is difficult to avoid the use of Sanskrit terms; but their number appearing in the body of the work has been reduced as far as possible, and a Glossary is provided to help the reader in finding out their meanings readily.

It provides a concise, connected account of Indian philosophy, and interpretation and criticism are provided within the limits of the volume.

The Essentials of Indian Philosophy provides a concise, connected account of Indian philosophy, and interpretation and criticism are provided within the limits of the volume. An introductory chapter summarises Vedic religion and philosophy, and then Indian thought respectively with the early post-Vedic period and the age of the systems. A brief historical survey accompanies each natural division of the subject, in addition to an exposition of its theory of knowledge, ontology and practical teaching. A glossary of Sanskrit terms and a good subject-index are provided.
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The present work is a simpler and shorter account of the author's previously published Outline of Indian Philosophy. Therefore, in accordance with the aim kept in view in writing, it leaves out many of the details included in the previous one. The difference between them, however, does not consist merely in these omissions: There is also variation in the treatment of some topics, as, for instance, in the first two chapters dealing with early Indian thought. At least in two cases, again, there are important additions. In the earlier book, Buddhism was dealt with in reference to two stages of its growth. There is a third phase, representing the doctrine as it was originally taught by Buddha; and a brief resume of it, as it has been reconstructed by scholars in recent years, also finds a place here. Similarly, the account of the Vedanta has been amplified by the inclusion of the Dvaita system of it. In treating of such a subject as Indian Philosophy, it is difficult to avoid the use of Sanskrit terms; but their number appearing in the body of the work has been reduced as far as possible, and a Glossary is provided to help the reader in finding out their meanings readily.

It provides a concise, connected account of Indian philosophy, and interpretation and criticism are provided within the limits of the volume.

The Essentials of Indian Philosophy provides a concise, connected account of Indian philosophy, and interpretation and criticism are provided within the limits of the volume. An introductory chapter summarises Vedic religion and philosophy, and then Indian thought respectively with the early post-Vedic period and the age of the systems. A brief historical survey accompanies each natural division of the subject, in addition to an exposition of its theory of knowledge, ontology and practical teaching. A glossary of Sanskrit terms and a good subject-index are provided.

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