The Snake Charmer - Tribal Lost Wax Craft 6"

SKU: 4116

Price:
$95
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Stock:
Only 1 unit left
Specification
  • Product Code :4116
  • Material :Brass Alloy
  • Size :3.25" x 6" x 5"
    Description

    Here brass alloy is nicely made use of to create the snake charmer tribal lost wax craft. This is a Dhokra painting and here the snake-charmer is playing his veena on a crocodile. Dhokra, locally known as “Bharai kaam”, is the art of sculpting brass with the ancient technique of lost wax casting. Practiced in West Bengal, Orissa and Madhya Pradesh, this metal craft finds different forms of expressions with the different tribes and traditions. Although Dhokra work involves casting molten metal in moulds, each piece is unique, as for every piece its own mould is made. A mixture of natural beeswax and saras, a kind of gum, is boiled to a thick paste like consistency and pressed through a sieve, to get fine noodle like threads. The unique property of natural beeswax allows it to remain flexible even when it cools down, so it can be turned and coiled in very small shapes. A thin coat of very fine mud covers the wax, over which a final coat of mud mixed with cow dung and hay is applied. Holes for letting melted metal in and liquid wax out, are made into the mud covering.Figures of elephants, horses, cattle and peacocks, utensils and jewellery are made by the craftsman, known as “Bhareva”, or “one who fills”.

    Description

    Specification
    • Product Code :4116
    • Material :Brass Alloy
    • Size :3.25" x 6" x 5"
      Description

      Here brass alloy is nicely made use of to create the snake charmer tribal lost wax craft. This is a Dhokra painting and here the snake-charmer is playing his veena on a crocodile. Dhokra, locally known as “Bharai kaam”, is the art of sculpting brass with the ancient technique of lost wax casting. Practiced in West Bengal, Orissa and Madhya Pradesh, this metal craft finds different forms of expressions with the different tribes and traditions. Although Dhokra work involves casting molten metal in moulds, each piece is unique, as for every piece its own mould is made. A mixture of natural beeswax and saras, a kind of gum, is boiled to a thick paste like consistency and pressed through a sieve, to get fine noodle like threads. The unique property of natural beeswax allows it to remain flexible even when it cools down, so it can be turned and coiled in very small shapes. A thin coat of very fine mud covers the wax, over which a final coat of mud mixed with cow dung and hay is applied. Holes for letting melted metal in and liquid wax out, are made into the mud covering.Figures of elephants, horses, cattle and peacocks, utensils and jewellery are made by the craftsman, known as “Bhareva”, or “one who fills”.

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