Twenty Third Jain Tirthankara Lord Parshvnatha - Brass Statue

Twenty Third Jain Tirthankara Lord Parshvnatha - Brass Statue

$48.00

The beautiful brass figure of the 23 Tirthankara Shri Parsvanath is given a spectacular treatment with some exquisite carvings. Here the figure is covered with the hood of a snake shading his head. Lord Parsvanath was a historical figure, who was believed to have lived 250 years before the last Tirthankara Bhagwan Mahavira. Lord Parsvanath led a luxurious life, but he was never attracted to material world. Having led family life for thirty years, Parsvanath left his domestic life at the age of 30. After three months of deep meditation and penance, Parsvanath attained Kevala-jnana. He spent the remaining life as a religious teacher spreading the message of Jainism for about 70 years. Parsvanath followed, the path of Ahimsa and respect for truth (Dharma) vigorously and they later became the social values of the time. People worshipped him as Bhagwan (God). Bhagwan Parsvanath introduced Chaturyam Dharma (four vows) for the disciples and followers. These are Ahimsa (non-violence), Satyavachan (abstinence from telling lies), Achaurya-Tyag (abstinence from stealing or taking what is not given) and Aparigraha (non-possession of property). To these, Mahavira added the fifth vow (Brahamcharya), viz. Sanyama i.e. to observe chastity.


Lord Parshvanath is always represented with the hood of a snake shading his head. The Yaksha Dharanendra and the Yakshi Padmavati are often shown flanking him. This is because of a famous legend. One day, Parshvanath was walking, when he saw an old man next to a fire. Because of his special knowledge called Avdhignan, he could tell that a pair of snakes was in one of the logs in the fire. He warned the man that he was burning the snakes. The man on the other hand, got angry and denied the presence of the snakes. Parshavanath pulled out the right log and put it out, then gently split it, revealing two burned snakes. He recited the Navkar Mantra, a prayer, for them before they died. It is believed that the two snakes were reincarnated into the two previously mentioned Yakshas: Dharanendra and Padmavati. This is why Lord Parshvanath is always represented with the hood of a snake shading his head. In Jain canonical literature, Parshvanatha is represented in 'padmasana' (lotus) posture – both palms and feet, with auspicious lotus marks on them, placed upward. He has blue-black complexion – the color of the cosmos. The seven-hooded serpent Shesh – umbrella-like unfurling its hoods over the deity, represented elements of the earth and the ocean.

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The beautiful brass figure of the 23 Tirthankara Shri Parsvanath is given a spectacular treatment with some exquisite carvings. Here the figure is covered with the hood of a snake shading his head. Lord Parsvanath was a historical figure, who was believed to have lived 250 years before the last Tirthankara Bhagwan Mahavira. Lord Parsvanath led a luxurious life, but he was never attracted to material world. Having led family life for thirty years, Parsvanath left his domestic life at the age of 30. After three months of deep meditation and penance, Parsvanath attained Kevala-jnana. He spent the remaining life as a religious teacher spreading the message of Jainism for about 70 years. Parsvanath followed, the path of Ahimsa and respect for truth (Dharma) vigorously and they later became the social values of the time. People worshipped him as Bhagwan (God). Bhagwan Parsvanath introduced Chaturyam Dharma (four vows) for the disciples and followers. These are Ahimsa (non-violence), Satyavachan (abstinence from telling lies), Achaurya-Tyag (abstinence from stealing or taking what is not given) and Aparigraha (non-possession of property). To these, Mahavira added the fifth vow (Brahamcharya), viz. Sanyama i.e. to observe chastity.


Lord Parshvanath is always represented with the hood of a snake shading his head. The Yaksha Dharanendra and the Yakshi Padmavati are often shown flanking him. This is because of a famous legend. One day, Parshvanath was walking, when he saw an old man next to a fire. Because of his special knowledge called Avdhignan, he could tell that a pair of snakes was in one of the logs in the fire. He warned the man that he was burning the snakes. The man on the other hand, got angry and denied the presence of the snakes. Parshavanath pulled out the right log and put it out, then gently split it, revealing two burned snakes. He recited the Navkar Mantra, a prayer, for them before they died. It is believed that the two snakes were reincarnated into the two previously mentioned Yakshas: Dharanendra and Padmavati. This is why Lord Parshvanath is always represented with the hood of a snake shading his head. In Jain canonical literature, Parshvanatha is represented in 'padmasana' (lotus) posture – both palms and feet, with auspicious lotus marks on them, placed upward. He has blue-black complexion – the color of the cosmos. The seven-hooded serpent Shesh – umbrella-like unfurling its hoods over the deity, represented elements of the earth and the ocean.

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