Victorious Lord Krishna - Brass Statue

Victorious Lord Krishna - Brass Statue

$245.00
The beautiful brass figure shows child Krishna vanquishing the serpents (Kaliya). The child is dancing over the heads of the snakes as the wives of the serpents are praying for the life of their husband. The story behind the particular scene is that there was a great lake within the river Yamuna and in that lake resided the black and poisonous serpent Kaliya. Due to the poisonous vapors emanated by him, the surrounding area was so contaminated that no living being would dare venture near the place. One day Krishna's fellow cowherds went near the lake and fell sick after drinking water from it. The Lord Krishna when learnt this got angry and vowed to vanquish the king of serpents and release the inhabitants of the country from the fear. Following a fierce battle, Krishna overpowered the serpents and following the prayers by the wives of the Kaliya, he pardoned Kaliya on the condition that Kaliya would leave the place forever. The manner in which Krishna subdues Kaliya has a fascinating quality about it. His dance to triumph, the effortless rhythm of the Almighty's pace of creation and destruction, the elegance, the complete play in the manifestations of the Lord's will, to which wind and water provide enchanted accompaniment, are beautifully highlighted in folklores. Indeed, this is the first inkling in textual material of Krishna as natwar (the dancer).


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The beautiful brass figure shows child Krishna vanquishing the serpents (Kaliya). The child is dancing over the heads of the snakes as the wives of the serpents are praying for the life of their husband. The story behind the particular scene is that there was a great lake within the river Yamuna and in that lake resided the black and poisonous serpent Kaliya. Due to the poisonous vapors emanated by him, the surrounding area was so contaminated that no living being would dare venture near the place. One day Krishna's fellow cowherds went near the lake and fell sick after drinking water from it. The Lord Krishna when learnt this got angry and vowed to vanquish the king of serpents and release the inhabitants of the country from the fear. Following a fierce battle, Krishna overpowered the serpents and following the prayers by the wives of the Kaliya, he pardoned Kaliya on the condition that Kaliya would leave the place forever. The manner in which Krishna subdues Kaliya has a fascinating quality about it. His dance to triumph, the effortless rhythm of the Almighty's pace of creation and destruction, the elegance, the complete play in the manifestations of the Lord's will, to which wind and water provide enchanted accompaniment, are beautifully highlighted in folklores. Indeed, this is the first inkling in textual material of Krishna as natwar (the dancer).


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